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Waterberg Plateau Park

The Waterberg Plateau Park is an island full of colors and biodiversity.

The Waterberg Plateau Park is a national park in central Namibia on the Waterberg Plateau, 68 kilometers southeast of Otjiwarongo. The plateau and the national park are named after the striking Table Mountain, which rises from the plateau, the Waterberg (German: Wasserberg). The Waterberg Plateau is a particularly striking place that rises high above the Kalahari plains in eastern Namibia. Waterberg Park and around 405 square kilometers of surrounding land were declared a nature reserve in 1972. Since the high plateau is largely inaccessible to several endangered species of Namibia, they were relocated in the early 1970s to protect them from predators and poaching extinction. The program was very successful and Waterberg now supplies other Namibian parks with rare animals. In 1989 the black rhino from Damaraland was reintroduced into the area. The African buffalo is also on the plateau of the mountain.

The Waterberg Plateau Park is ecologically diverse and rich and has over 200 different bird species with some rare species of small antelope on the lower hills of the mountain. Geologically speaking, the oldest layer of rock is over 850 million years old, and traces of dinosaurs remained there about 200 million years ago.

The plateau was declared a national monument in 1956.

Geologically speaking, the oldest layer of rock is over 850 million years old, and traces of dinosaurs remained there about 200 million years ago. The first human inhabitants were the San, who left rock engravings several thousand years old. Until the late 1960s, a small tribe of the San continued to live their traditional lifestyle on the plateau.

The location is also home to one of the most important turning points in the history of Namibia. In Waterberg, at the foot of the mountain, the Herero people lost their last and greatest fight against the German colonial forces at the beginning of the 20th century. The Herero had to withdraw from Waterberg and moved east to British Bechuanaland (now Botswana). Thousands were killed by the persecuting Germans and many died in the Kalahari desert due to lack of food and water. It is estimated that almost two thirds of the Herero population died during this period. The graves of German soldiers who lost their lives in Waterberg can still be seen near the Waterberg rest camp at the foot of the park